Ashley E. Kingsley

Posts Tagged ‘Public’

Private Life and Social Media

In App Technology, Facebook, Fail Whale, Leadership, New Media, Nimble, Social Media, Twitter, Women in Tech on August 21, 2009 at 10:44 pm

KeyholeSocial media, (#SM) since I started using it back in 1998 has evolved exponentially.  This is not news.  People have gravitated to multiple  SM vehicles over the years. Sites such as MY SPACE, FACEBOOK, LINKED IN, TWITTER, and DIGG to name a few.  It seems just in the last few years the term SM has exploded and everyone is either a guru or a maven, or wants to be.

Everyone is using it. TWITTER is no longer for the birds. BLOGGING is a mainstream term and everyone has one.  SM as its own department is a growing trend in large and small corporations across the globe.

This is a shift. People finally understand the value of communications, mass listening, monitoring, and connection via SM. It’s powerful. Ahh, how refreshing;  we are getting to the same page.

Now, how do SM and private life intersect.  That is the question. This is my opinion.

Many choose to keep their online lives separate from their professional lives. This is common. After all, do you really want your boss to see your private goings on via your FACEBOOK page?  Most of you will say, “hell no!” I disagree.

I choose not to ‘hide’ my online presence from anyone. I am not afraid to show the dimensions that are ME.  I am human. Many would argue that people will not want to hire me because I have blogs under my name about MISCARRIAGES, health concerns, life in general, and oh, yeah, I use profanity.  I think this is small mindedness.

We are all multi-dimensional creatures with  access to amazing tools and devices that allow us to connect in real time with people all over the world. We all have private lives as well as professional lives; but dividing them would be a shame.  I choose to be ME online and off.  This is who I am and this is who you are going to get.  What a loss for so many if you have to hide half of who you are in the work place?  Sad, really.  I must admit, this has been a struggle for me as I would imagine it would be for many.

WHY I CHOOSE TO BE OPEN WITH PRIVATE LIFE AND SOCIAL MEDIA

What if you could connect via common themes with people that have NOTHING to do with business, or vice versa. Connect with people through business that you wouldn’t have ever met if it were just left to personal fodder? 

SCENARIO

You come across someone on TWITTER or FACEBOOK or what have you. After several TWEETS and POKES you decide to meet for coffee.  Over coffee you realize you could be colleagues, partners, client/service providers or even friends!  How much are we losing out if we keep our private and social lives baracaded? What if we don’t take the risk or being ourselves and putting our best foot forward?

Employers should (SHOULD) recognize that most people have an online presence of some sort and their professional lives are only part of who they are as people.  If you can be who you are all the way through then there are no surprises, right? A wider stream in which to swim and connect with as many fish as possible would behoove us and our relationships; potentially creating life long business partnerships, contacts, customers and need I say it, friends.

Last year I was consulting for a company during the Democratic National Convention in Denver.  It was one of the most important weeks of my life.  I attended a panel on Global Poverty during my lunch hour and I TWEETED about it. Within a few hours my boss called me on the phone and asked where I was that afternoon? *He had a SOUR tone in his voice* and I knew where he was going with it. I replied “I was at a panel about Global Poverty during my lunch hour, why?”  He replied “I saw your TWITTER post and just wanted to ask.”   Well good for him for acting like big brother.  And good for me for being exactly who I am, doing my job and taking my lunch hour to learn about something that is important to me.

HOW

Be honest about your work and operate with integrity and there shouldn’t be anything to worry about.  I managed eleven people during a consulting job and every single one of them is my friend on my FACEBOOK. Does this make me a good boss? Well, I will leave that to you. BUT,  I don’t have my head where the sun doesn’t shine… and I am aware, that yes, in fact, people do have lives outside of work!  I would rather connect on the human level rather than expect my employees or my employers to think I am just a robot.

I am proud of my experiences, my ability to chronicle my life through business, private or both.  Of course Private Life and Social Media intersect. If yours don’t- try it.  If you’re scared of opening yourself up then there is always an option to play it safe and create separate profiles; one private and one public.    Just don’t get confused… someone is always watching, or listening!

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The White House Project

In Equality, Leadership, Motherhood, Nimble, Politics, Social Media, Women on March 31, 2008 at 4:59 am

WhitehouseProject

I have no idea where I got the email about The White House Project Leadership Training. I am not surprised however, as I tend to sign up for newsletters by the dozen. The newsletter arrived in my email box late one night and I decided to sign up for the training that was coming to Denver, CO. Why not?  The application process was straightforward and I sent it off without hesitation.

I have often toyed with the idea of getting involved in politics and perhaps running for office. This was a perfect segway into my aspirations of getting involved and learning more about the process and what it really does take to run.

*I will share the weekend in several parts as it was vast!*

MISSION:

The White House Project, a national, nonpartisan, not-for-profit organization, 501(c)(3), aims to advance women’s leadership in all communities and sectors, up to the U.S. presidency. By filling the leadership pipeline with a richly diverse, critical mass of women, we make American institutions, businesses and government truly representative. Through multi-platform programs, The White House Project creates a culture where America’s most valuable untapped resource—women—can succeed in all realms.

To advance this mission, The White House Project strives to support women and the issues that allow women to lead in their own lives and in the world. When women leaders bring their voices, vision and leadership to the table alongside men, the debate is more robust and the policy is more inclusive and sustainable. By supporting women and the values that allow women to succeed—the full range of health options, security platforms that utilize all our resources, economic stability for all—we work to create an equitable culture.

FRIDAY NIGHT:

What an amazing night! Let me just start by saying… the enthusiasm was awesome! When women come together is always very powerful because we are not afraid to express what we are passionate about. I was honored to be surrounded by such strength and wisdom. The women ranged in age from 17-65.  The evening kicked off with a ‘Why Women Matter Panel.’

  • Polly Baca – First woman of color to serve in the Colorado State Senate, President and CEO of Latin America Research and Service Agency (LARASA)
  • Nancy McNally – Mayor, City of Westminster
  • Gail Schoettler – Former Ambassador and Lieutenant Governor
  • Suzanne Williams – Colorado State Senator, SD28

As you can see, the panelists were impressive. Their accomplishments great and each one spoke with such integrity.

WOMEN DO MATTER and the reason we have to continue to remind people of this is because of these startling statistics:

If this isn’t enough to make your jaw drop you can visit CAWP for more information.  As you can see, there is a problem. Women need to be at the table having the conversations, leading the decision making process and orchestrating PRO-ACTIVE strategies rather than REACTIVE responses and sometimes no response.

So, yes, it is imperative that women GO, LEAD, RUN!

Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbossed

In Uncategorized on March 30, 2008 at 4:10 pm

chisholm I know that I didn’t read the history books from cover to cover when I was a student. I did however, educate myself politically over the years and somehow, I missed Shirley Chisholm. How is that possible?  She was the first African American women to run for the Presidency of the United States in 1971.

Through The White House Projectand the Political Leadership Training, is where I learned of Shirley Chisholm and where the Documentary ‘Shirley Chisholm: Unbought and Unbiased’ was featured.  I watched the documentary in awe and highly recommend you find it and watch it. It is one of the greatest clips of political history I have seen.  What I realized as I watched this film was how so littlehas changed, politically speaking. We were in Viet Nam in the lat 60’s and early 70’s and now in 2008 we have been in Iraq for five years… both  needlessly. We are watching a black candidate run for President and it is a really important time of transition.  How can we, as a country, as one of the richest and most developed nations in the world be in the very same place? I would have voted for Shirley Chisholm in the 1970’s. She was dynamic. She was a leader. Why do we always default to the white man? I wonder if things will change? Or do we continue to have the same wars, the same conflict, the same conversations?

Shirley Chisholm was the most dynamic candidate that I have seen in a long time. She spoke her mind and was incredibly strategic.  I haven’t in my lifetime witnessed such spunk in a candidate. She was indeed a trailblazer.

LEARN MORE:

In 1964, Chisholm ran for and was elected to the New York State Legislature. She then ran as the Democratic candidate for New York’s 12th District congressional seat and was elected to the House of Representatives in 1968, defeating Republican candidate James Farmer and becoming the first African-American woman elected to Congress.

As a freshman, Chisholm was assigned to the House Agricultural Committee. Given her urban district, she felt the placement was a waste of time and shocked many by demanding reassignment. She was then placed on the Veterans’ Affairs Committee. Soon after, she voted for Hale Boggs as House Majority Leader over John Conyers. As a reward for her support, Boggs assigned her to the much-prized Education and Labor Committee; she was the third-highest ranking member when she retired.

Chisholm joined the Congressional Black Caucus in 1969, as one of its founding members. In 1972, she made a bid for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, receiving 152 delegate votes,[citation needed] but ultimately losing the nomination to South Dakota Senator George McGovern. Chisholm’s base of support was ethnically diverse and included the National Organization for Women. Among the volunteers who were inspired by her campaign was Barbara Lee, who would go on to become a congresswoman some 25 years later. (Currently, Barbara Lee has a couple of pieces of legislation that would honor Shirley Chisholm, including H Con Res 9, calling on the US Postal Service to create a stamp honoring her, and HR 176, which would create a program to encourage educational exchanges between the US and Caribbean nations.) Chisholm said she ran for the office

in spite of hopeless odds, . . . to demonstrate the sheer will and refusal to accept the status quo.”

Chisholm created controversy when she visited rival and ideological opposite George Wallace in the hospital soon after his shooting in May 1972, during the 1972 presidential primary campaign. Several years later, when Chisholm worked on a bill to give domestic workers the right to a minimum wage, Wallace got her the votes of enough southern congressmen to push the legislation through the House. Throughout her tenure in Congress, Chisholm would work to improve opportunities for inner-city residents. She was a vocal opponent of the draft and supported spending increases for education, healthcare and other social services, and reductions in military spending. She announced her retirement from Congress in 1982, and was replaced by a fellow Democrat, Major Owens, in 1983. After leaving Congress, Chisholm was named to the Purington Chair at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts, where she taught for four years. She was also very popular on the lecture circuit.

In February 2005, Shirley Chisholm ’72: Unbought and Unbossed, a documentary film [4] was aired on U.S. public television. It chronicles Chisholm’s 1972 bid for the Democratic presidential nomination. It was directed and produced by independent, black woman filmmaker Shola Lynch. The film was featured at the Sundance Film Festival in 2004. On, April 9, 2006, the film was announced as a winner of a Peabody Award.

Chisholm retired to Florida and died on January 1, 2005. She is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo.

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